February 05, 2013 Kerala Taylor

Another playground wrapped in caution tape—what it means for our kids

At Stratford Landing Elementary School in Fairfax, Va., a nearly new playground sits wrapped in caution tape. It represents a struggle between a PTA, which raised $35,000 from silent auctions and bake sales to purchase and install the playground equipment, and school officials, who have deemed the play equipment too dangerous and are ordering its removal.

‘Too dangerous’ means that the equipment doesn’t meet the school district’s established safety standards. Though parents may be tempted to vilify the Fairfax County Public School administrators—who are offering the school $135,000 to replace the equipment—the administrators are hardly to blame for following their own protocol. Instead of pointing fingers, let’s shift the conversation. Instead of advocating for exceptions to the rule, let’s reexamine the rules.

The reams of caution tape at Stratford Landing serve as a potent symbol of a generation of kids who are missing out on vital opportunities to push and challenge themselves. Says eight-year-old Kes Shallbetter of the play equipment she barely got to play on: “I was upset because it was fun… It was exciting to have a new piece at the playground because the old pieces I got so bored at.”

It’s a shame that $35,000 of hard-earned PTA money may go to waste, but the much larger shame is that even with a $135,000 investment from the county, Kes may once again find herself bored during recess. And she isn’t the only one. Our playgrounds are failing to engage our country’s eight-, nine-, and ten-year-olds, pushing them to the sidelines at a time in their lives when they should be pushing themselves to climb higher.

A playground that challenges children not only keeps them active for longer, but it also motivates them to think creatively when they encounter obstacles and experiment with potential solutions. In other words, it prepares them to be healthy, innovative, successful adults who can navigate an increasingly complex and connected world.

The real question here is not: How can we save the equipment at Stratford Landing? The real question is: How can we save our children’s childhoods and futures—in Fairfax and beyond?

UPDATE: Though we must continue to ask ourselves how we can ensure that children across the country have access to challenging play equipment, we are happy to report that according to The Washington Post, "A dispute over a Fairfax County elementary school playground structure has been resolved after a school district official announced Wednesday that the equipment would no longer be off-limits to students."

Children flocked to the new playground equipment before it was slated for removal and wrapped in caution tape. Photos courtesy of the Stratford Landing PTA, via The Patch.

the buzz in play, risk, challenge, active play, recess, creativity, elementary school