June 04, 2014 KaBOOM!

Play is Critical to a Great Education

Image courtesy of Arztsamui

A recent Education Week commentary does a nice job of reflecting a KaBOOM! key principle: play and education go hand-in-hand. The commentary, The Case for the New Kindergarten: Challenging and Playful, centers on the false dichotomy "that preschool and kindergarten must either be geared toward play and socioemotional development or focused on rigorous academic instruction."

We couldn't agree more. Play should be a part of well-rounded school day. That is, kids need to learn to read, write, do math and practice problem-solving, teamwork, and creativity, all of which are essential outcomes promoted by Common Core standards.

Furthermore, we know play helps children adjust to the school setting, and enhances their learning readiness, behavior, and problem solving skills. Play indirectly contributes to children learning more hard skills in school by mitigating behavioral problems and increasing academic engagement. Schools without recess face increased incidents of classroom behavioral problems, which detract from learning time. Studies show play may also increase children's capacity to store new information, as their cognitive capacity is enhanced when they are offered drastic changes in activity.

Unfortunately, play is disappearing in schools. A 2009 study published in the journal Pediatrics found that 30 percent of children surveyed had little to no recess in their school day. That's nearly one in three kids. This is in spite of research, such as a Gallup poll revealing that elementary school principals overwhelmingly believe recess has a positive impact not only on the development of students' social skills, but also on achievement and learning in the classroom.

As global competition increases, it is imperative that children develop a skill-set relevant to today's workforce and are able to approach challenges with creative solutions in order to navigate our complex, ever-changing world. Critical thinking and collaboration are integral to the jobs of the future—many times more so than hard skills—and balanced and active play helps to develop these skills.

It's time we stop thinking of early childhood education models as an "either or" proposition and value and implement holistic instruction. We encourage you to join the discussion and post your thoughts below on the importance of protecting and promoting the importance of play for all children or share your ideas on how play can be incorporated into education. You can also share this blog post with your social networks to further the conversation.

education week, recess, schools