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Social entrepreneur - KaBOOM! News

As a Schwab Social Entrepreneur of the Year in 2011, KaBOOM! Founder and CEO Darell Hammond has the opportunity to participate in the World Economic Forum next week in Davos, Switzerland. It's a chance to meet business and thought leaders, but also to advocate for something that sparks true entrepreneurial thinking: unstructured play.

Hammond explains this further in a new piece for the Huffington Post:

Unstructured play gives kids the space they need to tinker and take risks -- both vital for the budding entrepreneur. Yet, too frequently these opportunities are being taken away from our kids in favor of more structured activities or time in front of a computer screen. The lack of free, child-directed play time for our kids today will have dire consequences for these future leaders, making them less prepared to solve complex challenges and problems. That is one reason why KaBOOM! has embraced the concept of the Imagination Playground™ which uses loose parts and encourages kids to use their imaginations and be creative.

You can read the full post here: "Play Today, Lead Tomorrow"


KaBOOM! Founder and CEO, Darell Hammond, was recognized by Forbes Magazine as one of the top 30 social entrepreneurs in the world. In determining their inaugural Impact 30 list of people using business to solve the world's most pressing social problems, Forbes turned to a panel of experts to "identify the leading innovators across health, education, finance and other sectors."

In selecting Hammond they not only recognized his unique talents in building a movement to save play, but also that play is critical to the health and well-being of our children. In fact, Jill Vialet, CEO and Founder of frequent KaBOOM! partner, Playworks, also made the list, further illustrating the growing momentum around the cause of play.

See the full Impact 30 list here.


Twenty-five hundred citizens from around the world have descended on the snowy ski resort of Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum's annual meeting. This year's theme is The Great Transformation: Shaping New Models. I like that it is about ‘shaping' new models and not necessarily ‘creating' them.

The diversity of people and confluence of ideologies is prevalent and core to the lively and smart discussions. Nowhere is the diversity more evident than in the outlook of the world's future. From my conversations thus far I have been struck by the conflict between those who are incredibly optimistic and carry a high level of confidence that new and better solutions are being developed through impactful innovators vs. those who are much more pessimistic about the future and the increasing number and power of the prolonged world crises we are experiencing.

Those bordering on pessimism believe that the new reality is here to stay. I am much more aligned to the optimists. And frankly, I have been struck by the optimism that is a common outlook of most of the social entrepreneurs. It seems rationale that a social entrepreneur exists because he/she is focused on creating solutions to our world's problems. We believe that our society's biggest challenges are solvable, and that, as Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Muhammad Yunus said, "the distance between the impossible and possible is shrinking."

One idea that I am certain is a game changer for all of us is the idea of collective impact. No one business, no one government, no single sector can do it alone. Multiple stakeholders need to have shared values because they truly have shared responsibilities. By taking collective action we can have collective impact, and that will be our fastest and most powerful path to the necessary solutions.

It was an incredibly exciting first day of Davos. While today is the first official day of the WEF, yesterday was a pre-forum day spent with Schwab Foundation Social Entrepreneurs. Between the programming of the brilliant and thoughtful Schwab Foundation's team and the talent of the Social Entrepreneurs in the room, it would have been worth the journey to Davos even if it were my only day here.

How can one not be optimistic about the new models we can shape and the resulting transformations we can have just based on the idealism, experience and perseverance in that room? I look forward to the continuing debate over the next couple of days. I was on a panel this morning for a session called The Creative Workplace. I will share more about that in an upcoming blog.


We are proud to announce that our CEO and Founder Darell Hammond has been recognized as a U.S. Social Entrepreneur of the Year by the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship! Darell joins a global network of leading social entrepreneurs from over 40 countries.

Schwab is recognizing Darell for pioneering our innovative community build model, which mobilizes communities in need around creating safe places to play. KaBOOM! has not only directly implemented this model in over 2,000 communities across North America, but we have also made our tools and resources available for anyone to access online, enabling thousands of DIY playground-building projects.

Darell is being recognized alongside Elizabeth Hausler of BuildChange, which is changing practices of home building in earthquake-prone regions like China, Indonesia and Haiti, and Dan Viederman of Verité, which ensures that people around the world work under safe, fair, and legal conditions.

"Despite working in very different sectors, these organizations share one thing in common," says Mirjam Schoning, Senior Director, Head of Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship. "They have developed strategic partnerships with the private and public sector to solve social problems. By developing innovative models that combine the strengths of government, business and civil society, they are able to accelerate their social impact, delivering better results for more people as cost-effectively as possible."

Learn more here.